Disney Plus Final Research Paper

What do Captain America, Darth Vader, Cinderella, Mike Wazowski, Jeff Goldblum, and Apollo moon missions all have in common? You can stream content with them all on the brand spanking new Disney Plus streaming service. It was and still is one of the most talked about digital arrivals of the 21st century. Disney Plus, also known and shown as Disney+, is a streaming service that contains the majority of Disney’s produced entertainment. It includes content from Walt Disney Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, 20th Century Fox, Lucasfilm, National Geographic, and so much more. It also comes with different plans, such as a strictly Disney plan or a bundle plan combined with Hulu and ESPN (ESPN+ included), which Disney already owns.

Back in April of this year, The New York Times wrote about the then up and coming Disney Plus streaming service being released relatively soon, “D-Day, as some in Hollywood called it” (Barnes). The buildup of tension as well as the launch of Disney’s streaming service was a turning point in the streaming wars. The prediction of this article said that there will be “roughly 500 films from Disney’s library, including new movies like Captain Marvel, and 7,500 episodes of old Disney-branded television shows like Hannah Montana” that will anchor Disney Plus (Barnes). Disney’s CEO, Mr. Bob Iger, called the Disney Plus library “a treasure trove of long-lasting, valuable content that no other content or technology company can rival” (Barnes). This New York Times piece also slightly bashed the newer Apple TV+ streaming service. Iger’s announcement was seen as positive for the future as well as challenged Apple, whose streaming pitch did not go so well. Disney Plus not only rivals Apple’s new streaming service, but existing services of Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime.

Dialing time back a notch, the transition from owning physical DVDs to owning subscription accounts on digital streaming services was not that long ago. Netflix even started as a DVD rental business and just recently started their service of streaming back at the end of 2006, early 2007. A variety of consumers have a variety of reactions and thoughts towards this shift of physical to digital. One article from a Winter 2017 Cinéaste edition has one man by the name of Richard Brody ask about the factor of bandwidth and whether it will stay up to par and up to pace with its consumers (Brody, 30). He says that he dislikes streaming content because it can still freeze up with good internet service (Brody, 30). Another man by the name of George Feltenstein argues that “there is no other medium capable of delivering so high quality a home entertainment experience today as UHD 4K Blu-ray with HDR” and “while streaming services provide convenience, they are also constrained by limitations of content, as opposed to permanent ownership” (Brody, 32). Feltenstein is saying that the video and audio qualities allowed by physical DVDs are much greater than that of streaming as well as we don’t have to worry about losing access to what we own whereas streaming services drop movie and television show titles here and there, sometimes with no return (I still haven’t forgiven Netflix for taking down Mean Girls). The change in appearances of streaming services from 2017 to 2019 has grown positively because internet is faster – for those who can afford it – and we are given a variety of content choices, including some services’ original content, which has improved the way we watch movies and television shows.

Disney Plus’ biggest streaming service rivals are Netflix, Hulu (when Disney+ is subscribed to without the Hulu add-on), and Amazon Prime. Focusing on Netflix, their MarketLine Company Profile from early 2019 shows that their 2018 fiscal year revenue was increased by 35.1% to give them $15,794.3M (MarketLine Company Profile). It also reported that their threats included “technological changes” and “intense competition” (MarketLine Company Profile).  Netflix is a profitable and still relatively new company when it comes to providing a streaming service. It has paved the way for other streaming services and given itself as a successful business model in the technological world. It has been so successful that other streaming services look like it … a lot. Check out the comparison between the Netflix and Disney Plus home pages. On the top is Netflix and on the bottom is Disney Plus (both screenshots from my accounts on my Mac).

There are “‘recommended for you’ rows of suggested shows and movies as well as the option to ‘continue watching’ programs” as well as “users can make a personalized avatar using characters from Disney’s intellectual property, including Buzz Lightyear and Moana” (Barnes). The rows of content and the creation of your own avatar for Disney Plus looks extremely similar to Netflix and their layout. Hulu also offers rows of content and I think that’s how Apple TV+ looks as well (I don’t have it). There’s also original content for most, if not all streaming services. Netflix has Stranger Things, Disney Plus has The Mandalorian, Hulu has The Handmaid’s Tale, and so on. Let’s cut to the chase and talk subscriber numbers. When Netflix launched their streaming service, they acquired another 1.18 million subscribers to their already 6.3 million count worldwide. Disney Plus has barely been released one month and already has a little over 10 million subscribers. The fact that Disney Plus already has 1/15th that of Netflix’s numbers and it’s only been out for one month is insane. To put it into perspective, it took Netflix a whole year to gain a little more than 1 million subscribers when they started streaming. Disney Plus has acquired 10 million in one month. Like I said, insane.

The reason Disney Plus has already had so much success is because of its pricing and content. The price you ask – only a small fee of $6.99/month. It also has different plans, such as the aforementioned bundle plan with Hulu and ESPN+ for a still relatively small fee of $12.99/month. Compared to Hulu streaming ($5.99 with ads and $11.99 without ads) and Netflix ($10.99/month), Disney Plus is relatively cheap for everything that comes with it. It was also announced that if you are a Verizon member, you get Disney+ for free for a whole year! You lucky Verizon bastards.

Image result for lady tremaine gif

Moving onto content (which I already went over in the beginning, but will tell you again to show you what a sheer power studio this almost-monopoly Disney is), Disney Plus offers the majority of Disney’s produced entertainment, including: content from Walt Disney Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, 20th Century Fox, Lucasfilm, National Geographic, and so much more. When I was doing research for this essay, I stumbled across real evidence of the saying history repeats itself. In 1954, the show Disneyland was premiered (Telotte, 100). This show not only was a hit, but was hosted by none other than Walt Disney himself! Funny how you think someone was way before your time but come to find out you only missed him by 32 short years.

Anyway, the Disneyland show “pointedly sold both old and new Disney: by packaging its large archive of short cartoons into thematic programs; by condensing or serializing its animated and live-action features; by creating sneak-preview episodes that promoted both new releases and films that, with its unique releasing plan, the studio regularly rereleased to ever-increasing profits; by pioneering ‘behind-the-scenes’ or ‘making-of’ documentaries that publicized the latest films; and by regularly reporting on the building and subsequent development of the Disneyland park” (Telotte, 101). So, what I’m telling you, is that Disney already put old and new content onto a new media technology and it worked out for them. Disney Plus offers a show called The Imagineering Story, which is an inside peek of Disney’s Imagineers and how they create and build Disney theme parks around the world. Disney Plus has The Mandalorian, which is a new character and story from the Lucasfilm Star Wars universe. Adding this to the content they have already produced, all the way back to 1937’s Snow White, Disney Plus has yet again combined old and new. Disney had tried and succeeded both in 1954 and 2019 in putting their content onto new technological media services, thus history repeats itself. So cool to see evidence of this in real life.

Image result for baby yoda smiling gif

Moving onto the advertising part of the Disney Plus streaming service, it’s quite a wild ride. Not only did they make multifarious promotional videos, my favorite one readily available on YouTube (and the one I made), but they got free advertising when their service crashed on day one. How does someone get free advertising when their product goes wrong? Disney was able to do just that. On the day of the launch of Disney Plus, there was a trending hashtag of #DisneyPlusFail. Upon further research of the tag throughout the day, it seemed that Disney had not taken enough of the proper technological precautions because there were too many users trying to stream and watch. You would never think that having too many subscribers as a negative thing. However, it did gain such popularity that cultural memes (and memes of memes – memeception) were made about it, including one of my favorites:

In their launch, causing the #DisneyPlusFail hashtag to blow up, and the amount of Snapchat, Facebook, and Instagram stories, Disney Plus was gaining free advertising throughout the whole process. So, not only are the kids at home seeing Disney+ advertisements between their shows on television, but teenagers, young adults, and many more demographics are getting both free and paid-for advertisements for the streaming service on their social media platforms. Therefore, Disney+ is not only becoming a monopoly of owning movie, product, and character rights franchises, they’re becoming a monopoly of social media via free advertising from their happy (and in the case of #DisneyPlusFail, frustrated, yet loyal) fans.

Lastly, and best said by Telotte, “Disney has … developed an effective internet presence that it uses, with growing sophistication, to entertain, to inform audiences about its latest productions, and, of course, to sell all things Disney, including artifacts from its theme parks, hotels, and movie productions. Through these many initiatives, it has become one of the world’s largest and most powerful media and entertainment companies, a giant that today largely stakes out the technological path that other entertainment companies follow” (16).

Image result for happy mickey gif

Sources

Barnes, Brooks, and John Koblin. “Disney Plus Streaming Service Is Unveiled to Hollywood Fanfare.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 11 Apr. 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/11/business/media/disney-plus-streaming.html.

Brody, Richard, et al. “From Disc to Stream: A Critical Symposium on the Changing World of Home Video.” Cinéaste, vol. 43, no. 1, 2017, pp. 30–40. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/26356824.

“MarketLine Company Profile: Netflix, Inc.” Netflix, Inc. MarketLine Company Profile, Sept. 2019, pp. 1–44. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=139115776&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Telotte, J. P.. The Mouse Machine: Disney and Technology, University of Illinois Press, 2008. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/emory/detail.action?docID=3413989.

Final Website Reflection :,)

As I said in my first website reflection back in September, I have never made a website before, so this was a new experience for me. Using [the free version of] WordPress was frustrating and difficult, but I got the majority of what I wanted out of it. Over the semester, I kept the “Singl” template that WordPress provided because I liked how I was able to have movie theater seats in the background at all times and how I was able to match my black, red, and white theme with it. I was also able to add a dropdown menu in the top right corner (not that it gave me a choice of where to put it) for easier navigation to other pages.

My website ended up being a little different than I thought, but I still found enough ‘me’ in it with all of the gifs and images I used as well as my informal writing style. At the beginning of the semester, I suggested that my blog might include a meme page, which it did not and I don’t feel like starting one for two reasons: (1) I’m lazy and it’s finals season and (2) I couldn’t figure out how to have a separate page with multiple selected posts. On the dropdown menu I created, you can click on singular posts, my blog feed of all of my posts in chronological order, or pages with shortcuts to specific posts. I tried to categorize my posts and put them on the corresponding pages, but either the page wasn’t visible in my dropdown bar or the post wasn’t visible on the page.

Overall, making this blog website on WordPress was as difficult as anticipated, but I’m glad that I was able to push through frustration to get what I wanted – especially visually – out of my site. I may or may not use WordPress in the future (and maybe this page will be lost in the depths of the internet if I don’t go on here once a week like I usually do…) but I will definitely keep up with the times of technology in expressing myself on the internet on multiple platforms within and without of social media. Creating my website affected how I understood the course material for FILM-208 because I was interacting in the space that Janet Murray as well as most of our other authors talked about. It was cool to explore what I could do in the confines of [the free version of] WordPress while also learning and engaging in material on digital media (inner me: that’s meta!!).  

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Disney Plus #ad Creative Project Final

For my creative project, I have chosen to make an advertisement for the Disney+ streaming service. I was originally planning to use Premier Pro for this project, but with learning a new technology was too much to take on during these last couple weeks, so I used iMovie on my Mac. I have used iMovie many times before, so it was easy to use and get what I wanted out of it. For getting clips and audio, I used 4K Video Downloader and 4K YouTube to MP3 (special thanks to Natalie for telling me about them, otherwise I would have continued to do the primitive way I was doing previously). Using these technological hacks, I was quickly and successfully able to download the YouTube video and audio files I was looking for and import them to iMovie with ease.

This Disney Plus advertisement was made by splicing video and audio to the overarching theme of “Transformation” (performed by Bulgarian Women’s Choir) from the Disney classic movie, Brother Bear (2003). I chose “Transformation” because it had a sweet beginning, epic buildup, and smooth finish that I was looking for as well as I think the title matches with what I was trying to do – transform all of my childhood memories into one cohesive video, much like Disney+ did with their content on their streaming service.

My creative project relates to my overall final topic of Disney+ as a new streaming service because what better way to show off something new than to make an ad for it? I wanted to show the content available on Disney Plus (yes, everything in this video is readily available to stream, I double checked) and that it encompassed Walt Disney Studios, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, National Geographic, and some 20th Century Fox. Disney Plus as a streaming service hasn’t even been out for a month and it’s one of the most popular hashtags, memes, and talked about things basically since sliced bread. So, I hope you enjoy my ad for the better-than-sliced-bread new streaming service of Disney Plus!

Disney Plus Research Essay Rough Draft

What do Captain America, Darth Vader, Cinderella, Mike Wazowski, Jeff Goldblum, and Apollo moon missions all have in common? You can stream them all on the brand spanking new Disney Plus streaming service. 

Released only 5 days ago, this past November 12th, it already has 10 million subscribers. To put that into perspective, both Hulu and Netflix’s streaming service (not counting the early days when they lent DVDs) launched in 2007, Hulu currently with 28 million subscribers and Netflix currently with 60 million subscribers. The Disney+ subscriber count is already more than 1/3rd that of Hulu’s and about the same as 1/6th that of Netflix’s … in just 5 days post launch.

Not only is Disney Plus a new fish in an already-giant ocean of streaming services, Apple TV+ also launched during November (November 1st to be exact). However, even after a little over 2 weeks of being launched, Apple TV Plus is only predicted to have 9 million subscribers or so by the end of 2019. Totally insane in comparison to the success of gaining the aforementioned 10 million subscribers to Disney+.

  • Put statistics about subscriber numbers before and after Disney Plus launch
    • Netflix
    • Hulu
    • Apple TV+ (if relevant)
    • Other services if necessary

Disney Plus offers the majority of Disney’s produced entertainment. It includes content from Disney Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, 20th Century Fox, Lucasfilm, National Geographic, and so much more. The price? Only a small fee of $6.99/month. It also has different plans, such as a bundle plan with Hulu and ESPN+ for a small fee of $12.99/month. Compared to Hulu streaming ($5.99 with ads and $11.99 without ads) and Netflix ($10.99/month), Disney+ is relatively cheap for everything that comes with it. It is also announced that if you are a Verizon member, you get Disney+ for free for a whole year.

  • Put statistics about prices before and after Disney Plus launch
    • Netflix
    • Hulu
    • Other services if necessary

On the day of the launch of Disney Plus, there was a trending hashtag of #DisneyPlusFail. Upon further research of the tag throughout the day, it seemed that Disney had not taken enough of the proper technological precautions because there were too many users trying to stream and watch. You would never think that having too many subscribers as a negative thing. However, it did gain such popularity that cultural memes (and memes of memes – memeception) were made about it, including one of my favorites:

In their launch, causing the #DisneyPlusFail hashtag to blow up, and the amount of Snapchat, Facebook, and Instagram stories, Disney Plus was gaining free advertising throughout the whole process. So, not only are the kids at home seeing Disney+ advertisements between their shows on television, but teenagers, young adults, and many more demographics are getting both free and paid-for advertisements for the streaming service on their social media platforms. Therefore, Disney+ is not only becoming a monopoly of owning movie, product, and character rights franchises, they’re becoming a monopoly of social media via free advertising from their happy (and in the case of #DisneyPlusFail, frustrated, yet loyal) fans.

Disney+ Creative Project Rough Draft

I have continued to stay on my creative project path of making an entertaining advertisement of sorts for Disney Plus. I am planning for the whole thing to be around 2 minutes or so, but it may be a tad longer given that Disney+ has endless content for me to choose from. Below is a screenshot of my current progress on iMovie. I have edited just short of 1 minute with audio from movie scenes (I’m planning on adding Disney music or maybe mashing songs together – still undecided). I am not a huge fan of what’s been edited so far, but you always judge harshest on yourself (meaning that the final product might be totally different from what you see here).

As you can see, I have content from Marvel Studios’ new television shows (just the title artwork), The Lion King (1994), Aladdin (1992), Cars (2006), Star Wars, and upcoming content from The World According to Jeff Goldblum and National Geographic’s Apollo: Missions to the Moon.

The main problem I had with working on this project was not finding the content, but finding a way to download/acquire the footage with good quality sound. I couldn’t achieve this on my Mac, so I went to my iPhone. I would screen record the content from YouTube because the TV app as well as the Netflix app won’t let you screen record (which is understandable with copyright issues). After screen recording the YouTube video on my iPhone, I would transfer it to my laptop, but the audio was missing because my Mac is smart enough to tell that it was copyrighted content from YouTube. So, I would put the screen recording from my iPhone onto iMovie on my iPhone, save it as something I made, export it to my Mac, and then I would have good quality videos for my iMovie on my Mac. It’s a long, tedious, and annoying process. (Screenshots below.)

Additionally, over the course of the semester, especially recently, I have been using the cable offered to Emory upperclassmen living on Clairmont and lemme tell you, the amount of Disney+ advertisements I have seen are insane! There’s so many (literally another trailer for The Mandalorian is on as I type)!! This makes it harder for me because I don’t want to copy anything that’s already out there, but I don’t want to be exactly like it either. I want my work to be an original take on what’s already out there (if that makes sense, and if not that’s okay because it makes sense in my head and that’s what counts).

Talk about “Disneyception”, or even better yet, “Lion-Kingception”with Simba, Scar, and Rafiki

Anyway, I really love watching Disney, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Fox, and National Geographic content as “research” for my project. The amount of ways I can go about my entertainment project are endless and I love it. Once Tuesday, November 12th, rolls around, I will have access to Disney+ and stylistic content to use from there to further the advertisement aspect of my video.

Image result for disney plus gif
(will Disney+ have Futurama if it has The Simpsons? more to discover soon, but this gif of Philip J. Fry is me towards Disney+)

Long story short, I’m about halfway done with mediocre results that I’m somewhat happy with, I am still looking for an easier process to get quality footage on my Mac’s iMovie, and I’m excited to finally have access to Disney+ soon!!

Disney+ Creative Project Proposal

The creative project I have (most likely) chosen to do for my topic of Disney+ is to make a half advertisement and half entertainment video. I want to create a video that has everything – or almost everything – that Disney Plus has promised to have when it releases November 12. This would also serve as a visual advertisement for the streaming service, thus half advertising and half entertainment. I want to push my skills as a video editor and try new editing techniques as well as potentially use new technology like Adobe Premiere Pro. The inspiration for this choice came from re-watching the commercial that Disney already put out for their new streaming service as well as re-watching one of my favorite video edits of all time. I would like to create a video that combines the ideas of these two videos. I’ve always wanted to make a “movie edit” video where clips from movies are put to music, such as Captain America scenes to “Old Town Road” or MCU scenes to “Lions Inside,” because I think they’re so freaking cool.

Another reason I would like to create this video is because of the timing of everything. Our rough draft of the project is due November 10th and the final draft of our project is due December 4th. This means that I should be able to pick out all of the video content from released Disney movies and trailers before November 10th to complete about half of the video. Once November 12th rolls around, I will have access to the streaming service platform and can use the visuals and content from Disney+ itself before turning in the final draft on December 4th. I’m super excited to start looking for potential footage and song choices to work with in the near future … which means I get to watch old Disney content – what’s not to like?

Disney+ Research Annotated Bibliography

Telotte, J. P.. The Mouse Machine: Disney and Technology, University of Illinois Press, 2008. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/emory/detail.action?docID=3413989.

Source Type: eBook

Written by Georgia Tech Film and Media Studies professor, J. P. Telotte, this book is a chronological history of the Walt Disney Company using and creating technology in film and media. He argues that these innovations to the company are essential to how Disney came to be and how it got such a glamorous reputation. He also discusses partnerships with big name companies including Pixar as well as partnerships with early-to-today television. The Studio’s historical investments of technology through its years will allow me to see how the Walt Disney Company has always been aiming for first regarding being the best film company. It has always looked for an edge above other competitions and that’s exactly what Disney is doing now with their integration into the streaming platform market. Telotte’s knowledge on the technological history of Disney up until 2008 (when the book was published) will help me delve deeper into the history of Disney and how it kept technologically evolving. 

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Dixon, Wheeler Winston. Streaming: Movies, Media, and Instant Access. The University Press of Kentucky, 2013.Project MUSEmuse.jhu.edu/book/22596.

Source Type: eBook

This book dives into the world of digital and streaming media. Dixon talks about what digital and streaming formats of movies means for the big screen. He also reveals the positive and negative sides of this transition to digital services. The integration of streaming for Hollywood films and companies is argued as cheaper, easier, and faster, thus more bang for their buck, but not necessarily to the viewers. This switch from big screen to personal screen will affect the entertainment industry as well as how we watch and perceive their movies. In today’s society, our use of streaming services like Netflix and Hulu definitely outnumber our movie-goer count when it comes to the number of views. Personally, I saw Marvel Studios’ Infinity War 6 times in theaters, but another 17 times (yes, I count) once I digitally owned it. So, the transition and transformation of movies from the big screen in its early days to something as small as my laptop or phone – with instant access – has changed the movie industry both positively and negatively. Dixon’s facts and opinions will allow me to see how Disney+ is going to integrate its streaming and digital services with what content it already has and what content is on the way.

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Brody, Richard, et al. “From Disc to Stream: A Critical Symposium on the Changing World of Home Video.” Cinéaste, vol. 43, no. 1, 2017, pp. 30–40. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/26356824.

Source Type: Article

This eleven-page article is about the entertainment transition from physical to digital, specifically DVDs to digital storage. Multifarious authors contribute their opinions on the matter, including personal anecdotes and nostalgia, like wandering the aisles of a Blockbuster store. A few speak negatively of this transition, trashing streaming services, but most are positive and give upbeat reactions toward this shift of entertainment platforms. Our social culture today is all about “Netflix-binging” and having instant access to all of the entertainment we love. This puts the hassle of rewinding the VHS to watch a movie or simply finding the DVD out of sight and out of mind. One negative side that was brought up by one of the additional authors, George Feltenstein, is that streaming services are great, but its contents are not guaranteed. One day your favorite movie will be there, and the next day it might be gone. With Disney’s upcoming streaming service, it is not said that everything Walt Disney Studios has ever made will be on there and there is no guarantee of permanent movies or shows at the moment. The transition from owning physical Disney VHSs and DVDs to being able to digitally own and stream will have interesting effects on Disney’s market.

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“MarketLine Company Profile: Netflix, Inc.” Netflix, Inc. MarketLine Company Profile, Sept. 2019, pp. 1–44. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=139115776&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Source Type: Financial Report/Marketing Profile

This is a market profile for the company of Netflix. It gives information about what Netflix is, what services it offers, and chronological history of the company. It also provides information about Netflix’s fiscal year for 2018. These numbers include paid memberships, revenues, fees, countries using it, and overall profits. This market profile on EBSCOhost also provides information on contracts and agreements with new companies, new products and services for its members, and corporate changes and expansions as a company. Lastly, it provides the most recent top employees, including chairman, chief marketing officer, chief financial officer, and senior management, as well as their age, when they joined, and their job description. This in-depth information on the Netflix company as a whole can give me insight to how profitable and business-heavy the world of digital streaming is. I can use this information to gauge how profitable Netflix is right now and potentially predict the threat level of Disney + to Netflix and maybe even how profitable Disney+ will be in comparison when it is launched this coming November.

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Barnes, Brooks, and John Koblin. “Disney Plus Streaming Service Is Unveiled to Hollywood Fanfare.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 11 Apr. 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/11/business/media/disney-plus-streaming.html.

Source Type: Article

This article was released online on April 11, 2019, so it is extremely recent. Authors Barnes and Koblin discuss Bob Iger’s presentation on the new and upcoming Disney Plus (Disney+) streaming service. Iger’s announcement is seen as positive for the future as well as challenging Apple, whose streaming pitch did not go so well. Barnes and Koblin go into detail on what Disney Plus is, what it will cost to its subscribers/members, and some insight on what will be available on it. They also discuss what the chairman of Disney’s Direct-to-Consumer, Kevin Mayer, had to say about potential bundles included in Disney+. These bundles may be the Disney+ subscription with ESPN and/or Hulu added for an additional fee. Iger’s announcement of Disney Plus back in 2017 changed the game for all streaming services. It will most likely run head-to-head with Netflix, whose memberships and profits grew exponentially after it went from renting DVDs to streaming online via smart television, laptop, phone, etc. This short, yet effective, article is helpful for me to see a general look at Disney+ and what it is capable of.

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Joanne, Denise. “DISNEY+ EARLY ACCESS!! First Look At Disney Plus Streaming Service | Denise Joanne.” YouTube, uploaded by Denise Joanne, 13 Sept. 2019, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwcA0FtJ3HE.

Source Type: YouTube Review/Walkthrough Video

Denise Joanne lives in the Netherlands, which is where Disney granted access to use their new streaming service, Disney+, two months before it is released in the United States (and everywhere else) to see how people would use, react, and spread the word about it. Joanne’s review is extremely positive as well as she shows how she uses Disney Plus in her own home on her television and computer. She goes into depth on how each user can pick their own avatar, which will be a Disney character such as Thanos, animated Hercules, and even Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, who is Mikey Mouse’s precursor. She then goes through all of the movies and tv shows offered on Disney Plus as well as what categories they are filed under. One thing that Disney+ has not released yet are its original television shows, like The Mandalorian, or original movies, like Lady and the Tramp. Overall, her review is bubbly and positive and her walkthrough is very detailed and in-depth. This video gives me insight on how Disney+ is formatted (which is a lot like other streaming services) and how it differs from what I already use.

Personal Essay on Disney+

On November 8th, 2018, our world of streaming services was given a huge announcement, the beginning of a new streaming service:

Image result for disney plus gif

Disney+ will launch on November 12th, 2019. Disney’s streaming service will contain the majority – or maybe all – of Disney’s produced movies and tv shows. It will include content from Disney Studios, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, Pixar, 20th Century Fox, National Geographic, and so much more. Much like streaming services of today, primarily Netflix and Hulu, it will have endless entertainment for those who become members. Even more so like Netflix, Disney+’s users will be able to download the tv shows and movies as well.

Continuing to compare Disney+ to the streaming services of Netflix and Hulu, Disney+ will also stream original tv shows and movies. Netflix has the iconic teen movie of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and science fiction hit of Stranger Things. Hulu has social media’s recommended tv shows including The Handmaid’s Tale and The Act. On August 23rd, 2019, Disney+ made its first ever announcement at a D23 Expo to talk about what originals it will be creating.

It will be, “Never-before-seen original feature films, series, short-form content and documentaries,” according to the Disney+ website. This vast catalog includes Star Wars: The Mandalorian, The World According to Jeff Goldblum, the Lady and the Tramp 2019 remake (like Disney did with The Lion King), Loki, WandaVision, and The Falcon and the Winter Soldier. (I’ve included links to trailers that have already been released.) Along with Disney’s new original content, as aforementioned, a lot of produced Disney entertainment will be on there as well.

Now for the price. You would think that Disney, being one of the most well-known companies in the world, along with:

  • Being on the Fortune Global 500 list 25 times
  • Ranked #170 on the Fortune Global 500 list for 2019
  • Overall yearly revenue of $59.4 billion
  • Famous animated feature films
  • Multiple world-renowned theme parks
  • Its annual revenue only decreasing twice since 1991
  • Board of Directors include the Chairman of Twitter and the CEO of Facebook
  • Merchandise available almost everywhere you shop

that Disney would charge something similar to Netflix, which its most basic plan is $8.99/month and most popular plan is $12.99/month (for HD quality streaming), or Hulu, which its most basic plan is $7.99/month and commercial-free plan is $11.99/month.

Now also don’t forget what companies Disney owns:

  • ABC
  • ESPN (80%)
  • Touchstone Pictures
  • Marvel
  • Lucasfilm
  • A&E (50%)
  • The History Channel (50%)
  • Lifetime (50%)
  • Pixar
  • Hollywood Records
  • Vice Media (10%)
  • Core Publishing

And don’t even get me started on what brands Disney owns. Basically, any big entertainment name you can think of, Disney most likely owns it. For example, Marvel is Disney, Star Wars is Disney, the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise is Disney, and the Indiana Jones franchise is Disney.

If you want to see everything that Disney owns, I highly suggest you look at this infographic. It’s intense.

Now, if you guessed Disney would charge a high price for their streaming service, you would be incorrect, my friend, for Disney+ is only a mere $6.99/month or $69.99 for the whole year.

I can sense Netflix and Hulu shaking in their digital boots. One of the main reasons I still use Netflix is to watch classic Disney movies, such as Tarzan, Chicken Little, Princess and the Frog, and Meet the Robinsons. In fact, Netflix has an entire page dedicated to Disney movies, and let me tell you, it’s a pretty big page. Hulu is where I catch my Hercules, Pocahontas, and Ratatouille as well as it has some other Disney content on there too.

With Disney+ coming out, the Disney company is taking back all of its content from streaming services we have now.

Now, that’s a major power move. If popular streaming services like Netflix and Hulu won’t have access to allow their subscribers to stream Disney content (that we all know a good 90% of the streamer population does), what will happen to Netflix’s and Hulu’s subscribers? The faithful ones will stay, but what will happen to the subscribers only using it so they don’t have to pay for each and every Disney movie and tv show they watch?

Netflix has about 152 million subscribers and Hulu has about 28 million subscribers. Sources say that, within the fiscal year of Disney+’s launch (2024), it could bring in 60-90 million subscribers. That’s already more than half of Netflix’s, and it’s been streaming content for almost 9 whole years now. Hulu is a smaller number, but they shouldn’t be as worried, for they are not exactly Disney+’s competitor.

Disney+ has announced it will be offering a package plan that includes Hulu. Prices for this plan as well as other package plans have not yet been released but are due to be released soon. I currently have the Spotify and Hulu student combination plan, so I am not quite sure what my future plan is or what my family’s plan is, but we are definitely getting some form of Disney+ when it’s launched this November.

Personally, I am a huge Disney fan (if you couldn’t tell yet). My Spotify playlist of songs from Disney movies is a whopping 6 hours and 24 minutes long. And those are just the songs I know the lyrics to. Whenever I listen to this playlist, it’s hard to skip any songs because I love them so much. That’s how I feel about Disney entertainment content as well, especially for the Marvel Cinematic Universe. You can ask almost anyone on Emory’s campus who knows me, and they will tell you that I’m the biggest Marvel movie buff they have ever met. I mean, just look at my “Marvel Wall” in my apartment (not including a couple of other posters in my bedroom or the Marvel placemats on my table, and yes, Darth Vader made a cameo in this pic, but he’s cool regardless):

I also have a Star Wars wall, but that’s for later – back to Disney+.

Disney+ is probably the best thing that will ever happen to entertainment streaming services in my opinion. It is going to have everything I (and many, many other people) will ever need. It will range from National Geographic documentaries, to the classic Disney films we all grew up with, to Jeff Goldblum talking about how he sees the world in, well, a Jeff-Goldblum-y way and it will be totally awesome. I’m more than looking forward to November 12th.

The last thing I will leave you with is a trailer/advertisement for Disney+ that I cried (don’t judge me) while watching because I’m so excited.

Sunset Boulevard: Extra Credit #3

This past Wednesday, Emory’s Cinematheque screened Sunset Boulevard (1950) – which I had not seen before – as part of its Billy Wilder series. Before I made it to the screening, I was working Emory’s varsity volleyball game versus Lee University (where Emory swept them 3-0), but the game ended right as the screening was scheduled to start. I sprinted across campus to White Hall and sadly missed the majority of Dr. Bernstein’s opening speech about Billy Wilder and Sunset Boulevard. After Dr. Bernstein’s speech, I found a seat in the front row (best row) with my friend, Ben, who had already seen it before. The room itself was about 85-90% full, mostly middle-aged and older folks.

Image result for ready for my closeup gif

The only thing I knew about Sunset Boulevard was the iconic line of, “I’m ready for my close-up,” so I didn’t really know what to expect. Sunset Boulevard was a film about an aging silent film era star, Norma Desmond (played by the famous Gloria Swanson), who can’t accept that her fame had come to an end with the film industry moving to sound. She decides to write her own film about Salome and that’s when Joe Gillis (played by William Holden) runs into her. Joe had been facing money problems and ran away to what he thought was an abandoned house, which was Norma’s house. That’s when everything changed.

It was funny watching the way Norma dramatized everything she did. It was as if her life was still in a silent movie. The face-shaping makeup, dramatic reactions to minor events, form-fitting wardrobe, exaggerated facial expressions – all parts of a great silent film that she was still living in. It was also interesting to watch Norma fight for her screen time back because, in my Classical Film Theory course, we are reading Rudolf Arnheim and how he believed sound corrupted the true art that silent cinema is. I thought that Rudolf should be Norma’s final husband and I told my professor my idea, and he laughingly agreed. However, the best part of the entire film was the surprise cameo of silent film superstar, barely second to Charlie Chaplin himself, Buster Keaton!! Overall, I really liked the movie and I’m glad I got to see it in its full effect on the big screen, but it’s not one of my favorites.

Final Project Proposal

The topic I am going to choose for my semester-long project will be…

*drum roll please*

Disney+ !!

I have chosen to do my final project on Disney+ because I find it both very relevant as well as something I am going to use myself. Disney+ (Disney Plus) is a streaming service that will contain the majority (if not all) of Disney’s produced entertainment. It will include content from Disney Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, 20th Century Fox, Lucasfilm, and so much more. It also comes with different plans, such as a strictly Disney plan or a bundle plan with Hulu. Disney+ is not available now, but it will be available this fall on November 12th.

I am super excited to write about news revealed at D23 Expos as well as find out what other specifics I can about Disney+ before, during, and after their release this semester. I feel that I can research streaming services that are popular now and see if they are worried of what Disney+ will do to their subscribers. I am mainly excited to be able to get the majority of Disney, Pixar, MCU, and Star Wars all from one streaming platform and am curious what other people out there think of Disney+. Overall, I think Disney+ will be an interesting topic for my final project because of the perfect timing due to it being released this semester, meaning I can first-person work with the before, during, and after its release.